View Full Gallery

It’s been 45 days of travel, too much has happened to even articulate. Many things that we have initiated in different parts of the world in the last month could change the complexion of what we will be doing in the coming years if it all bears fruit.

We are seeing how we can drum it up in the coming year or two, and then sit down for more focused work here at the ashram and maybe a little bit elsewhere. So before we settle for that kind of work, it is important that we cast a much wider net. I am looking for people who are ready for other kinds of possibilities. To pass on something of this magnitude and immensity, it is best that there are many backup systems so that future generations do not miss out. We are really drumming it up in various places to see that we cast a really wide net to bring people with innate possibilities who may never explore these possibilities unless they are reminded. The human problem and predicament is like this. Suppose you were imprisoned for many years and one day someone came and quietly unlocked the door and went away. Most people would still not find their freedom. They need a neon sign – “This Way to Freedom” – otherwise they won’t make it. Somehow, they have to be kicked out of their cells. Otherwise, they won’t go.

If you want to create something that is worthwhile in people’s lives and for future generations, it will take a certain amount of involvement and sacrifice, otherwise it won’t happen. Right now, the Aadhi Yogi Alayam and the Teerthakund construction are going on. Whatever you see has not simply happened, people have worked day and night, seven days a week, for the last four months to get ready for the December 23rd consecration. It is still nothing if you look at it, but in the next 15 days, the Aadhi Yogi Alayam needs to stand up. That is a lot of work. Normally, it would take a minimum of 12-18 months to finish a building like this – we are doing it in about 4 1/2 months. It is insane. And it has been raining at least half the time since we started the construction.

The way we are constructing the Teerthakund is such that each block weighs 45-50 tons – we are using fifty ton “bricks.” Nowhere else on the planet is this type of construction happening right now. Things like this were only done in ancient times. When we build a temple, we want to ensure that it is here for a long period of time, I am thinking 5,000 years. I do not want to build a temple in concrete cement which will collapse in 100 years, because the energy process that we conduct will easily last 4-5,000 years.

Since I landed in Hyderabad from the United States, it has been one whirlwind of a schedule. It took me to various events in Hyderabad, Kolkata, and above all, to Sikkim for the first time. This is a state in India that I have never been to until now. Have always been wanting to go to Gangtok, heard so much about it, but somehow never made it. In Sikkim, one of our meditators is doing a major hydroelectric project. It is the biggest of its kind in India right now, a 1,200 megawatt project, and it was incredible to see. What has been done there is something that will make you proud of being human, a labyrinth of tunnels going through the mountain in many different ways, and in a complex web which moves the water in a manner that is productive and again puts it back in the river. The whole length of the tunnels measures up to 32 kilometers. It was incredible to meet this team and look through the whole project, and as all of you know, two months ago Sikkim experienced an earthquake measuring 6.9 on the Richter, and over 54 people lost their lives in the region, 22 of them from the project itself. Though so much damage happened to the area, no damage happened to the project. That proves the level of engineering skill. It was truly an eye opener for me to see what a great job these engineers have done there. We also established Bhairavi in the powerhouse which is yet to become functional.

Kolkata, Sikkim, a sathsang in Mumbai, and back to Coimbatore, all in less than 36 hours. Here I am.

Love & Grace,