Isha Samskriti students were part of the Samskrita Maha Sammelan, and participated in singing, dance, elocution, storytelling, and a wonderfully choreographed play on Karna.

Sanskrit is one the oldest and the most scientifically designed language on the planet. It is also one of the few living languages that is thousands of years old. However, the language isn’t as popular as it once was in India. The Samskrita Maha Sammelan, organized by the Samskrita Bharati Trust (Dakshina Tamil Nadu) is an effort to reverse this trend. The sammelan was organized on October 24-25 in Coimbatore, and included song, dance, elocution, quizzes and much more – all in Sanskrit.

Isha Samskriti students were part of the event too. 52 children participated in solo and group singing, group dance, chanting sessions, situational conversation, elocution, storytelling, a skit, and a quiz, besides giving a power-point presentation about Sanskrit.

The students also performed a specially choreographed play “Karna”. Their clear diction, authentic costume and stage settings, and wonderful acting skills were appreciated, and the play was received with overwhelming enthusiasm. A unique aspect of the play was the use of shadow-play techniques to depict war scenes. An enthusiastic, energetic team of 21 students constituted the cast and backstage support. The play was scripted, directed and visualized by the students themselves.

Isha Samskriti was founded by Sadhguru, and is envisioned as an offering to children, allowing them to explore their innate capabilities. It establishes the right situation for the child to seek a deeper experience and inner understanding of the fundamentals of life. Located at the Isha Yoga Center, at the foothills of the Velliangiri Mountains near Coimbatore, Isha Samskriti provides an ideal environment of dedication, discipline and focus, allowing children to develop into dynamic, capable and dedicated human beings. Children are also taught a unique blend of yogic practices, Indian classical arts such as Bharatanatyam and Carnatic music, and martial arts such as Kalaripayattu, which bring balance and stability to the child’s body and mind.